This Optical Illusion Reveals How Stressed You Are in 2 Seconds!

It seems that these days stress is inevitable part of our daily life. Even when you think that your day is going fine, there is a great chance that it will strike you.

For instance, when you are cuddled up in front of the TV and your brain reminds you about your tasks for the upcoming day, it is there, getting ready to hit.

Statistics in regard to stress reveal disturbing epidemic in U.S. As a matter of fact,  Stress.org, suggests that 44 percent of Americans are more stressed out when compared to five years ago. This organization also notes that 10 percent of all strokes and 60 percent of all illnesses and diseases are result of work-related stress.

Although it is generally believed that obesity is the major health issue in America, it turns out that 3 out of 4 doctor visits are for stress-related diseases. Consequently, over $300 billion are spent in medical bills and lost productivity, which is $100 billion more than what obesity costs.

Do you know how to determine your stress level? While headaches, chest pain, upset stomach, and muscle tension are considered as normal signs, there is also an “interesting” way to tell how stressed you are.

Akioshi Kitaoka, Japanese psychiatrist, has created a set of images which help people determine their state of mind.  

  1. If the images appear to be still, it indicates that you are relaxed.
  2. If they are moving slowly, you are stressed to a small degree
  3. If the images are really moving around, you are super stressed!

Note:  In case the test shows that you are super stressed, it doesn’t necessarily means that you have to jump to any medical conclusion. However, it still shows that you need to inhale and take it easy.

Here are the Illusions:

1

2

3

4


Article and Image Sources:
http://www.davidwolfe.com/optical-illusion-stressed-2-seconds/
http://www.bitrebels.com/lifestyle/how-to-determine-your-stress-level-in-2-seconds/
http://www.pickchur.com/2011/02/visual-illusions-that-tell-about-your-psychological-condition/